Saturday, November 24, 2018

Next Generation Education 4.0 Systems - Part 2

You may have already run across the terms Industry 4.0, Work 4.0, Health 4.0 … It's now time to start talking about emerging efforts to collaborate on designing and building next generation Education 4.0 solutions.

The U.S. is in the process of developing and implementing Education 3.0, which is an umbrella term used to describe a variety of ways we have been moving over the past decade to better integrate digital technologies into learning using web-based and mobile technologies. It involves moving away from tradition classes and lectures, focusing instead on more innovative interactive learning systems customized to needs of individual students. These current efforts will continue well into the next decade.

Focus of Next Generation Education

Some selected excerpts from A Model for the Future of Education”
  • The 3R’s - Reading, ‘Riting’ & ‘Rithmetic’
  • Literature & Communication Skills
  • Creative Expression & Improvisation
  • Foreign Language & Culture
  • Logic & Analytical Thinking
  • Ethics , Morality & Empathy
  • Technology Exposure & Coding
  • Innovation & Scientific Experimentation
  • Entrepreneurship & Marketing
  • Persistence & Passion
  • Collaboration & Sharing

The recommended focus of next gen’ educational systems listed above doesn’t seem to differ much from existing approaches and content already employed in our schools. So what have we missed? What else needs to be added to further enhance our educational system?

Focus of Next Generation Education

Looking beyond the coming decade, Education 4.0 is a term starting to be used to describe changing technologies, focus, and systems that need to be put into place by 2050. Additional changes in our education system are needed to further complement and support the global shift to Manufacturing 4.0, Health 4.0, and other ‘next gen’ advances in every industry and aspect of society. These changes will be characterized by use of ever more advanced and innovative systems utilizing artificial intelligence (AI), invisible user interfaces (IUI), and the convergence of many other new and emerging technologies - coupled with 'open access' to knowledge, science, and other data resources.


The following is a brief
brainstormed list of new technologies, educational needs, processes, projections, and predictions about the field of Education & Training in 2050. Some of the many steadily converging technologies will have a tremendous impact on the future of Education & Training in the 2030-2050 timeframe. These technologies and solutions will include:


Artificial Intelligence (AI)
Augmented Reality
Brain Interface Technologies
Free & Open Source Software
Free & Open Access Textbooks
Implantable Systems
Invisible User Interface (IUI)
Language Translation Technology
Multimedia Educational Materials
Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC)
Mobile Technology & Apps
Personal Learning Assistant
Robotics
Social Media
Telepathy
Televideo
Virtual Reality
Virtual Classrooms
Wearable systems
3D Printing Technology

How to best employ these many new technologies I leave in the hands of our many tremendous educational professionals and our free market system. I expect there will be a lot of trial and error before we get it right. I look forward to seeing our ‘next gen’ educational system of the future.

What will our Education 4.0 system look like by the time we complete the transition from a Type 0 Civilization into a Type 1 Civilization – see previous blog on the Kardashev scale.


Selected Links
* Also, you might want to check out Summerton SC Blogs on Education 4.0 and Type 1 Civilization.



Next Generation Education 4.0 Systems - Part 1

You may have already run across the terms Industry 4.0, Work 4.0, Health 4.0 … It's now time to start talking about emerging efforts to collaborate on designing and building next generation Education 4.0 solutions.

The U.S. is in the process of developing and implementing Education 3.0, which is an umbrella term used to describe a variety of ways we have been moving over the past decade to better integrate digital technologies into learning using web-based and mobile technologies. It involves moving away from classes and traditional lectures, focusing instead on interactive learning customized to needs of individual students. These efforts will continue well into the next decade.

Looking a bit further into the future, Education 4.0 is a term starting to be used to describe the systems that will be put into place by 2040 to complement and support the global shift to Manufacturing 4.0, Health 4.0, and other next generation advances in every industry and aspect of society. It is characterized by more advanced and innovative systems utilizing artificial intelligence (AI), invisible user interfaces (IUI), and the convergence of many other new technologies - coupled with 'open access' to knowledge, science, and other data resources.


Five Issues With ‘Traditional’ Schools


Excerpts from “A Model for the Future of Education”
  • Grading: In the traditional education system, you start at an “A,” and every time you get something wrong, your score gets lower and lower. It’s demotivating. In the online gaming world (e.g. Angry Birds), it’s just the opposite. You start with zero and every time you come up with something right, your score gets higher and higher.
  • Sage on the Stage: Most classrooms have a teacher up in front of class lecturing to a classroom of students, half of whom are bored and half of whom are lost. The one-teacher-fits-all model comes from an era of scarcity where great teachers and schools were rare.
  • Relevance: When I think back to elementary and secondary school, I realize how much of what I learned was never actually useful later in life, and how many of my critical lessons for success I had to pick up on my own. I don’t know about you, but I haven’t ever actually had to factor a polynomial in my adult life.
  • Imagination vs. Coloring inside the Lines: With the factory-worker, industrial-era origin of today’s schools, programs are so structured with rote memorization that it squashes the originality from most children. In today’s world, we need to foster imagination and innovative ideas in our schools.
  • Boring: If learning in school is a chore, boring, or emotionless, then the most important driver of human learning is disengaged. i.e. passion. Having our children memorize facts and figures, sit passively in class, and take mundane standardized tests completely defeats the purpose.
An average of 7,200 students drop out of high school each day, totaling 1.3 million each year. Over 50 percent of these high school dropouts name 'boredom' as the number one reason they left.


New Technologies for 'Next Gen' Education Systems


The following is a brief brainstormed list of new technologies, educational needs, processes, projections, and predictions about the field of Education & Training in 2050. Some of the many slowly converging technologies will have a tremendous impact on the future of Education & Training in the coming decades include:

Artificial Intelligence (AI)
Augmented Reality
Brain Interface Technologies
Free & Open Source Software
Free & Open Access Textbooks
Implantable Systems Invisible User Interface (IUI) Language Translation Technology
Multimedia Educational Materials
Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC)
Mobile Technology & Apps
Personal Learning Assistant
Robotics
Social Media
Telepathy
Televideo
Virtual Reality
Virtual Classrooms
Wearable systems
3D Printing Technology


The question is, what attributes will be most critical for our children to learn in order to be successful in the future? We'll explore that further in Part 2 of this series. In the meantime, check out the following selected links.


Selected Links




 


Preliminary List of the Potential Democratic Presidential Contenders in 2020

It’s time for the Democratic Party to get serious about identifying and surfacing its top contenders for the 2020 Presidential Election. I read an article in the Washington Post entitled “The Top 15 Democratic presidential candidates for 2020” but it seemed all over the spectrum andway off base. The list contained:

#15 John Delaney, #14 Michael Avenatti, #13 Deval Patruck, #12 Hillary Clinton (Really!), #11 Amy Klobuchar, #10 Terry McAuliffe, #9 Michael Boomberg, #8 Beto O’Rourke, #7 Sherrod Brown, #6 Kirsten Gillibrand, #5 Cory Booker, #4 Joe Biden, #3 Kamala Harris, #2 Bernie Sanders, and #1 Elizabeth Warren.

Their list of honorable mentions included Eric Holder, Oprah Winfrey, Chris Murphy, Mitch Landrieu, Andrew M. Cuomo, Steve Bullock, Jason Kander, Pete Buttigieg, Eric Garcetti, Juli├ín Castro, Tim Ryan, Tom Steyer, John Hickenlooper, Jeff Merkley, Seth Moulton, Martin O’Malley, Eric Swalwell, Jay Inslee, Howard Schultz

The Washington Post list gave me some heartburn. So here is my first prediction from out in America’s heartland of potential Democratic candidates that may have some sort of chance of actually winning. It’s a bit different than what comes out of Washington D.C.

  1. Joe Biden
  2. Michael Bloomburg
  3. Joe Manchin
  4. Bernie Sanders
  5. Elizabeth Warren

My short list of honorable mentions include Beto O’Rourke, Cory Booker, and Kamala Harris. No matter what happens, it will be an exciting 2020 primary season for the Democrats and the country.



Can you think of any other Democratic Party candidates with a real shot at winning? Let our readers know.